#HEATCHECK Music Video

It's been a couple weeks since I've gotten back to Vancouver and it's finally feeling like I'm getting settled back into my regular routine. Have a watch of the HEATCHECK Music video with Francis Arevalo:

A few months ago my Dad & Uncle officially closed down Killarney Market. I grew up at the store and besides school and home, this was the next place I spent the most time. As a kid, I would spend weekends playing in the backroom, waiting for my parents to get off of work. The store felt like a second home. 

Since getting into filmmaking and helping the crew during Michael Buble's Music video, the idea of filming something at the store was always in the back of my mind. It wasn't until 10 days before they ownership was officially changing that this idea with Francis sprung up. A huge S/O to the crew that came out and made this possible! 

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Here are some thoughts from a facebook post I shared a while back:

I was reading over the comments on the Killarney Market facebook page and it was a surreal experience reading what all the customers had to say. One of my favourites being: "I'm in mourning, that's for sure" And, in referencing the Michale Buble Music Video: "The last time there were this many white people in Killarney was 1972." Hahah.

Walking around the store the past month, I was reflecting on the impact the Legacy my Dad, Mom, Uncle Tito and the number of staff have had on their community.

My dad told me once that the store's importance wasn't necessarily in running a "successful" business, but creating a place of community for the neighbourhood. I saw this firsthand working there from the time I was 8, until high school. I got to know regulars, I was raised by employees from all different backgrounds, and learned what it meant to be in a service industry. I saw the importance of grocery shopping in peoples lives: a lively encounter with an old friend, a chance for people in the neighbourhood to gather and a place for people to come and feed their families.

It's only now, after my parents have retired that I can fully see the legacy and impact they've had on the Killarney community. It really has me thinking about my business and my work and why I do what I do.

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Crush Hush IV // #DISTRIKTFAM

YOUTH IS AN ATTITUDE, NOT A NUMBER. STAY YOUNG, STAY IGNORANT.

SURROUND YOURSELF WITH POSITIVE PEOPLE AND ENCOURAGE THEM.

BE CHILDLIKE IN WONDER. BE ROMANTIC IN REVOLT.
— BOBBY HUNDREDS

Describing the DISTRIKT is like sharing a meme (check this if you're confused). Cecil Adams from theStraightDope.com describes the concepts of memes as something that "is either really deep, or really, really obvious." On the first glance, you may get the joke. And upon closer inspection, you may see layers of meaning that go way deeper. 

On the outside, the DISTRIKT is a community of people who engage in fitness classes and yoga. It is what you expect it to be, a hard, sweaty workout with fun people. Got it. 

Once you go a bit deeper, you realize there's more to it. Jian describes the studio as a front for creating something bigger than just movement. Movement is the access point to create connection between humans. REAL connection, not the kind that's sold on a sponsored Instagram post. Before leaving my job, I knew I needed some time and space to reset. This was the perfect environment to recharge and take some time away from the city. 

Calling Crush Hush a retreat, doesn't quite fully capture the experience. Leaving Crush Hush, I feel more connected. More understood. And more a part of a community. 

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